Tag Archives: seed saving

The Role of Flowers in Pollination

2014 7-1 Straight Eight Cucumbers (2)Show Me Oz – No matter where you live in the country, you are either itching to get your hands in the dirt or are already in the garden digging, planting and dreaming! If you want to save seed this year, you have come to the right place! Because today we are talking about flowers and how they achieve pollination – and what those two things have to do with saving pure quality seed. Understanding these things not only helps you reap a larger harvest of fruits and vegetables to eat, but also ensures that the seeds you harvest from those fruits will come true in next year’s garden. So, let’s get right to it!  Read more….

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Seed Saving Time: Testing Germination Rates

Testing seed quality and germination rates. showmeoz.wordpress.comLast week, I received my first spring seed catalog.  And while it’s a bit early for me to even think about ordering seed for next year, it is an early reminder to test some of the seed stock I currently have on hand. Checking the quality of the seed you save is just as important as saving it. After all, there’s nothing more disappointing than spending hours planting seeds that either germinates slowly, patchy, unevenly, or (gasp) not at all.  So, whether you save your own seed or lean heavily towards “accumulating” seed, you should be testing at least a portion of your stash every winter.  Read the entire article here.

Seed Saving Time: Legumes

Snow peas will cross with snow, snap and shell peas.

By Jill Henderson – via Show Me Oz 

If you’re planning on saving some of your own seeds this summer, the very best time to start is before a single seed goes in the ground.  In fact, your seed saving efforts should begin with that catalog you’ve been perusing all winter.  In addition to a myriad of valuable information such as germination times, growth characteristics, suggested planting dates and so on, many seed catalogs now list each vegetable’s Latin botanical name, as well.  You know the one I’m talking about…those two  little words written in italics and perched between parenthesis can mean the difference between seed saving success or seed saving failure.  READ ON….

Why Save Seed? GMO’s and Your Garden

Don't let your garden become contaminated with GMO vegetables and fruits.

by Jill Henderson – Show Me Oz

Last week we discussed some of the more obvious reasons for saving your own seed: to be more self-sufficient and save money, to adapt varieties to the local environment, and to increase genetic diversity in food crops.  But, of course, I can’t talk about saving seeds without discussing Genetically Modified Organisms, (GMO’s) otherwise known as Franken-food.

I think by now most Americans have a general understanding of what GMO’s are, but just so we’re all on the same page, let me give you a quick definition. GMO’s are organisms (in this case, food crops) that have had their natural genetic structure altered by literally forcing the genes of unrelated plants, animals, insects, fungi, bacteria, viruses and even human genes into the host plant’s embryonic cells using a virus as a vector to infect the host and spread the new gene.  Read the entire article here.

Saving Seed Equals Healthier Plants

Howdy Seeders!Young, healthy seedlings are ready to be thinned, repotted, or planted outdoors. Image copyright Jill Henderson

I want to share a bit of seed saving and sowing insight from Master Seedsman, Justin Huhn.  Justin’s blog, The Seedkeepers, is a wealth of information for anyone wanting to learn more about seed!  Be sure to dig deeply through his site and be sure to sign up for his weekly email newsletter, from which the following originated… Continue reading

Why Save Seed? Selection & Genetic Diversity

Saving lettuce seed couldn't get any easier. Image copyright Jill Henderson ShowMeOz.wordpress.com

I have been saving seed for almost 20 years.  What started out as a simple way to save a buck, quickly became a passion with very deep roots.  After all these years, it is exciting to see so many people interested in saving their own garden seed.  In fact, saving seed has become quite popular. But there are those who still think it’s just a fad – another hashtag in a world of buzzwords. And perhaps seed saving is just another trend in a long line of trends – like bacon everything, backyard chickens, and kale, but for those of us who have worked towards seed sovereignty and food freedom for years, an American seed saving fetish is just what this country needs!

Read the entire article at Show Me Oz
https://showmeoz.wordpress.com/2015/02/17/why-save-seed/

Share the Seed Thanks Southern Exposure Seed Exchange

SESE logoShare the Seed would like to thank Southern Exposure Seed Exchange for their generous donation of starter seeds for the members of the project in 2014.  The seed from SESE allows our members to start their seed saving efforts with pure, high-quality seed!

In addition to a catalog containing over 700 open-pollinated heirloom varieties of fruits, vegetables, grains, cover crops, and other specialty items, Southern Exposure Seed Exchange is “a worker-run cooperative where every worker has a voice in the decisions of the company and where workers receive equal compensation regardless of the economic value traditionally placed on the jobs done.”  Hats off to SESE for their dedication to GMO-free seeds and their work supporting small community-minded groups like ours!

For those wanting to learn more about saving their own seed, SESE has a ton of fantastic resources on their website.  Check out their Growing Guides and Library for detailed information on every crop imaginable!